Oil pollution act of 1990 limit

The Act was meant to be the primary federal legislation addressing oil spills viability of the Shipowner's Limitation of Liability Act of 1851 (Limitation Act), Congress passed, and President Bush signed, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA ). In response to the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the United States Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA). The OPA extensively amended the Federal 

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA) (101 H.R.1465, P.L. 101-380) was passed by the 101st Furthermore, the Oil Pollution Act proscribes limits to liability for damages based on the responsible party, the particular incident, and the type of  Feb 13, 2020 The Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990 streamlined and strengthened EPA's ability to prevent and respond to catastrophic oil spills. A trust fund  Title I of OPA established new and higher liability limits for oil spills, with commensurate changes to financial responsibility requirements. It substantially broadened  Dec 4, 2018 AN ACT To establish limitations on liability for damages resulting from oil pollu- tion, to establish a fund for the payment of compensation for such 

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 establishes limitations on the liability of responsible parties for certain damages caused by a discharge of oil into the navigable waters of the United States. For the reader’s convenience, this appendix provides the liability limitation language as it appears in 33 U.S.C. § 2704.

Aug 18, 1990 I am today signing into law H.R. 1465, the "Oil Pollution Act of 1990. It is shortsighted to restrict exploration for this relatively clean energy  Feb 25, 2016 There are, however, substantial barriers to victim recoveries under state law, such as legal defenses, statutes of limitation, the corporate form and  governments for actions taken to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life laws – the Stafford Act of 1988 and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Although these two  qualifies as a vessel; yet, as a MODU, the rig also qualifies as an offshore facility that may attract higher liability limits under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA). Jun 20, 2017 Congress enacted the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) in 1990, following the from offshore and federal lands and to restrict the definition of waters of  May 18, 2010 The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 set up new procedures for offshore cleanups, one significant change being that the federal government, led by the 

Jun 2, 2015 Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (“OPA 90”), and the Deepwater Port Act of 1974 lower the liability limit to not less than $50 million if risk so warrants 

Oct 18, 2011 Consumer Price Index Adjustments of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 Limit of Liability for Offshore Facilities(published December 12, 2014) Aug 27, 2019 The US Oil Pollution Act 1990 (OPA 90) provides for an adjustment of the limits of liability according to increase in Consumer Price Index (CPI) 

33 U.S. Code SUBCHAPTER I— OIL POLLUTION LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION. U.S. Code; Notes. prev | next · § 2701. Definitions · § 2702. Elements of 

The liability limit for offshore facilities is $75 million plus the cost of cleanup. 29. After liability limits are reached, damages are to be paid from the Oil. Spill Liability  Oil Pollution Act of 1990 - Title I: Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Requires the periodic adjustment of liability limits to reflect increases in the  Jun 2, 2010 Among other provisions, OPA limits certain liabilities of a responsible party in connection with discharges of oil into such areas. The liability 

The greater of $1,100 per gross ton or $939,800. (b) Deepwater ports. (1) The OPA 90 limit of liability for any 

This Act, referred to in subsec. (b)(1), is Pub. L. 101–380, Aug. 18, 1990, 104 Stat. 484, as amended, known as the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 2701 of this title and Tables. The penalties for violations have a maximum of $250,000 and 15 years in prison. §4301(b) Civil penalties are authorized at $25,000 for each day of violation or $1,000 per barrel of oil discharged. Failure to comply with a Federal removal order can result in civil penalties of up to $25,000 for each day of violation. 37 Sec. 3005 OIL POLLUTION ACT OF 1990. (1) prevent discharges of oil on the Great Lakes; (2) ensure an immediate and effective removal of oil on the Great Lakes; and (3) fully compensate those who are injured by a discharge of oil on the Great Lakes. This Act, referred to in text, is Pub. L. 101–380, Aug. 18, 1990, 104 Stat. 484, as amended, known as the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out below and Tables. The Deepwater Port Act of 1974, referred to in pars. An analysis of the extent to which oil discharges from vessels and nonvessel sources have or are likely to result in removal costs and damages (as defined in section 1001 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. 2701)) for which no defense to liability exists under section 1003 of such Act [33 U.S.C. 2703] and that exceed the liability The Oil Pollution Act (OPA) was passed in the wake of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March of 1989. The statute establishes liability and limitations on liability for damages resulting from oil pollution, and establishes a fund for the payment of compensation for such damages. Oil Pollution Act of 1990 - Title I: Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation - Establishes the Oil Spill Compensation Fund. Makes the responsible party for a vessel or facility from which oil is discharged (or which poses a substantial threat of discharge) liable for removal costs and for economic or natural resource damages, including: (1) injury or loss of real or personal property or natural resources; (2) loss of use (including subsistence use) of natural resources; (3) loss or

5. In the NPRM for the 2015 adjustment, titled Consumer Price Index Adjustments of Oil Pollution Act of 1990 Limits of Liability-Vessels, Deepwater Ports and Onshore Facilities, the Coast Guard proposed a simplified regulatory procedure for making future inflation updates to the OPA 90 limits of liability. For non-tank vessels, including vessels carrying edible oil and oil spill response vessels, the new limits are the greater of USD1,100 per gross ton or USD939,800. The limit of liability for deepwater ports (other than the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port or LOOP) and onshore facilities is now USD633,850,000. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 establishes limitations on the liability of responsible parties for certain damages caused by a discharge of oil into the navigable waters of the United States. For the reader’s convenience, this appendix provides the liability limitation language as it appears in 33 U.S.C. § 2704. This Act, referred to in subsec. (b)(1), is Pub. L. 101–380, Aug. 18, 1990, 104 Stat. 484, as amended, known as the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 2701 of this title and Tables.